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Illustration EU-valet 2019

The 2019 EU elections

Sunday 26th of May

The elections to the European Parliament will take place on 26 May 2019 in Sweden. In the EU elections, the citizens of the EU member states will choose by means of general elections those who will represent them in the European Parliament during the next five years.

About the EU elections

  • Elections to the European Parliament take place every five years in all EU member states.
  • In Sweden, the election will take place on Sunday 26 May 2019.

Your right to vote

The European Parliament is the only EU institution that is directly elected in general elections. You are entitled to vote in the elections to the European Parliament in Sweden if you are a Swedish citizen and you have reached the age of 18 by election day at the latest. You are also entitled to vote in the election to the European Parliament if you are a citizen of another EU member state and are registered in Sweden.

Vote in advance or vote on election day

The EU elections work in the same way as the elections to the municipalities, county councils and parliament in Sweden. A voting card is sent to you at your home and you can then either vote in advance or vote at a polling station on election day. You choose which party you would like to represent you in the European Parliament.

You can also vote for a specific person on the party list by putting a cross next to the name of the person on the voting slip. A particular party must receive at least 4 per cent of the votes to get into the European Parliament.

Election Authority website:

Here you can find out more about the EU elections in Sweden, voting rights and the electoral register, how to vote, ballot papers, and how election results are calculated.

The Election Authority website

Important dates

  • 11 apr 2019

    From 11 April – advance voting by post from abroad

    From the 11 April onwards, you can send a postal vote from abroad.
  • 26 apr 2019

    26 April – the electoral register is confirmed

    The electoral register is determined based on the information in the population register at the Swedish Tax Agency.
  • 2 maj 2019

    From 2 May – vote abroad

    Voting at missions abroad can begin on 2 May. These voting facilities can begin at various points in time and continue for differing periods. This is also the first day a vote by proxy can be arranged.
  • 8 maj 2019

    8 May – advance voting begins

    Now you can begin voting in advance at any of the premises for advance voting around Sweden. Take your voting card and ID with you! It is also possible from this date to leave votes by proxy at polling stations.
  • 23 maj 2019

    23–26 May – elections to the European Parliament

    Elections to the European Parliament in all EU member states.
  • 26 maj 2019

    26 May – EU elections in Sweden

    Polling stations are open 8 a.m. – 9 p.m. Once the voting has been competed, the municipalities carry out a preliminary vote count. Both the preliminary and the final result will be shown on www.val.se.
  • 27 maj 2019

    27 May – the vote count begins

    The county administrative board begins the final vote count.
  • 27 May – members of the European Parliament begin forming groups

    From 27 May onwards the newly elected members of parliament (MEPs) begin the process of forming political groups in the European Parliament.
  • One week after the EU elections

    Approx. one week after election day, the Election Authority establishes the election result and appoints members and alternate members.
  • 2 July – the new electoral period begins

    The electoral period for the newly elected European Parliament commences on 2 July with a meeting in Strasbourg, France.

What is the European Parliament?

The European Parliament is the voice of the citizens of the EU. The members of the European Parliament are elected by the citizens of the EU member states in general elections. The European Parliament operates both in Strasbourg in France and in Brussels in Belgium.

There are 751 members in the European Parliament from the EU’s 28 member states. They are known as MEPs (members of the European Parliament). They take part in the decision-making regarding EU laws and the EU budget.

 

There are currently 751 members in the European Parliament. There are currently 751 members in the European Parliament.
Together, voters in the 28 EU member states have elected 751 MEPs. They represent the voters in the European Parliament until 2019.

The number of MEPs after Brexit

The UK is in the process of withdrawing from the EU (Brexit). Once this has taken place, the number of MEPs will have fallen to 705. Negotiations are in progress between the UK and the EU on the conditions for withdrawal.

The Swedish MEPs

During the latest electoral period, 20 Swedish MEPs have represented Swedish citizens. By voting in the EU elections, the citizens of the EU member states decide which political parties and members of parliament will take part in the decision-making in the European Parliament.

Swedish MEPs 2014–19 on the European Parliament website

 

There are currently 751 members in the European Parliament. There are currently 751 members in the European Parliament.
The EU member states have varying numbers of members in the European Parliament. The number of MEPs from each country depends on the size of its population. Germany, which has the largest population in the EU, has 96 MEPs. Cyprus, Estonia, Luxembourg and Malta each elect six MEPs, the smallest number for any one member state.

 

MEPs are part of their party groups

The members of the European Parliament debate EU matters and develop new EU laws. Each MEP is part of a party group. Each party group consists of MEPs with similar opinions.

In the Parliament, the MEPs sit together in their party groups, not together with other members from the same country. Parties of the left sit on the left and parties of the right on the right. The Greens and Liberal parties sit in the middle.

Overview of the MEP's according to party group in the EP Overview of the MEP's according to party group in the EP
There are eight party groups and a number of MEPs who or not attached to party groups in the European Parliament. The diagram shows the location of the party groups in the European Parliament. Note that the borderlines between the party groups in the image are approximate. This information is from March 2018.

Parties represented in the European Parliament and number of members

  • GUE/NGL 52 Members of Parliament (MEPs)
    Confederal Group of the European United Left - Nordic Green Left. The Left Party is part of this group.
  • S&D 186 MEPs
    Group of the Progressive Alliance of Socialists and Democrats in the European Parliament. The Social Democratic Party and Feminist Initiative are part of this group.
  • Greens/EFA 52 MEPs
    Group of the Greens/European Free Alliance. The Green Party is part of this group.
  • ALDE 68 MEPs
    Group of the Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe. The Liberal Party and the Centre Party are part of this group.
  • EPP 217 MEPs
    Group of the European People´s Party (Christian Democrats). The Moderate Party and the Christian Democrats are part of this group.
  • ECR 75 MEPs
    European Conservatives and Reformists Group. The Sweden Democrats are part of this group.
  • EFDD 41 MEPs
    Europe of Freedom and Direct Democracy Group.
  • ENF 37 MEPs
    Europe of Nations and Freedom.
  • NI 22 MEPs
    Non-attached Members.

MEPs by Member State in the European Parliament

  • 96 Germany
  • 74 France
  • 73 Italy and United Kingdom
  • 54 Spain
  • 51 Poland
  • 32 Romania
  • 26 Netherlands
  • 21 Greece, Belgium, Portugal, Czechia and Hungary
  • 20 Sweden
  • 18 Austria
  • 17 Bulgaria
  • 13 Denmark and Finland
  • 11 Ireland and Lithuania
  • 8 Slovenia and Latvia
  • 6 Estonia, Cyprus, Luxembourg and Malta

The UK is in the process of withdrawing from the EU (Brexit). Once this has taken place, the number of MEPs will have fallen to 705.

MEPs by Member State and political group on the European Parliament website

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