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Illustration EU-valet 2019

The 2019 EU elections

Sunday 26 May

The elections to the European Parliament took place on 26 May 2019 in Sweden. In the EU elections, the citizens of the EU member states choose by means of general elections those who will represent them in the European Parliament during the next five years.

About the EU elections

  • Elections to the European Parliament take place every five years in all EU member states.
  • In Sweden, the election took place on Sunday 26 May 2019.

Results of the EU elections

Elections to the European Parliament were held in all EU member states between 23 and 26 May. In Sweden, the elections took place on 26 May.

The Election Authority has information about the result of the Swedish EU elections. The European Parliament has information about the election results in the whole of the EU.

 

Important dates

  • 26 maj 2019

    26 May – EU elections in Sweden

    The elections to the European Parliament took place on 26 May 2019 in Sweden. The election result is available on www.val.se.
  • 31 maj 2019

    31 May – The Election Authority established the result of the elections

    On Friday 31 May, the Election Authority established the election results in Sweden and the Swedish MEPs and alternate members were appointed.
  • End of June – political groups established

    The composition of the political groups in the European Parliament were established and the groups presented the members belonging to each group.
  • 2 jul 2019

    2 July – the new electoral period began

    The electoral period for the newly elected European Parliament commenced on 2 July with a meeting in Strasbourg, France. The Italian social democrat David Sassoli was elected as the new President of Parliament.
  • 16 jul 2019

    16 July – the parliament approved the President of the Commission

    The heads of state and government in the European Council proposed the German Ursula von der Leyen as candidate for new President of the European Commission. On 16 July, the European Parliament voted in favour of the proposal.
  • 8 aug 2019

    8 August – the Government proposed a European Commissioner

    The Swedish Government proposed the Minister for Employment Ylva Johansson as the new Swedish European Commissioner.
  • 10 sep 2019

    10 September – proposal for new European Commission was presented

    The upcoming President of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, presented the complete proposal for a new European Commission.
  • September and October – hearings in the committees

    Questions will be put to the proposed European Commissioners by the committees of the European Parliament. The hearings will be held 30 September–8 October.
  • October – the European Parliament approves the European Commission

    The European Parliament votes on whether it can approve the entire new European Commission.
  • 1 nov 2019

    In November – new European Commission in place

    On 1 November, the new European Commission will begin to work with everything as planned.

After the EU elections - what happens next?

About a week after the EU elections, the Election Authority established the Swedish election result and the distribution of Swedish seats in the European Parliament.

The Election Authority counted how many seats each party had received on the basis of the votes, and which of the parties’ candidates had been elected to the new European Parliament. Only parties that had received more than 4 per cent of the votes were counted. Parties with fewer than 4 per cent of the votes did not get any seats in the European Parliament.

Sweden currently has 20 seats in the European Parliament. When the UK leaves the EU, Sweden will be allocated one more seat, bringing the total to 21 seats.

2 July - the new electoral period began

The new electoral period began on 2 July, and the new European Parliament commenced its work with a meeting in Strasbourg, France. The Parliament started by electing Italian social democrat David Sassoli as its new President. It is the President who leads the work of the European Parliament. The members of the European Parliament (MEPs) then selected which committees they will work in, and the chairs of the various committees. Most MEPs are members of one committee, and deputy members (substitutes) of another.

New President of the European Commission

On 16 July, the Parliament approved the new President of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen from Germany. It is the heads of state and government of the EU member states in the European Council that propose the candidate for President of the Commission, but the proposal must be approved by the European Parliament. According to the EU treaties, the President's political opinions shall reflect the majority in the newly elected Parliament.

The new European Commission

In Sweden, it is the Government that proposes the European Commissioner from Sweden. On 8 August, the Swedish Government proposed the Minister for Employment Ylva Johansson as the new Swedish European Commissioner.

The President of the European Commission has now, together with the EU member states, put together a proposal for the composition of the new European Commission and who is to be responsible for what in the Commission. The nominated Commissioners will be invited to hearings in the European Parliament committees, where they will answer both oral and written questions.

After they have all been heard, the MEPs take a vote on whether or not they can approve the entire new European Commission. At this stage, they cannot vote on whether or not they approve of individual nominees. The goal is that the new European Commission will start its work on 1 November 2019.

Many positions are filled after an EU election

After an election to the European Parliament, there are many positions in the EU that need to be filled with new people. As mentioned above, the Parliament has elected a new President and approved the new President of the European Commission. The entire European Commission will now by appointed, with one member (commissioner) from each member state, in total 28.

The heads of state and government in the European Council have also elected a new President to lead and coordinate the Council's work, the Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel. He will take up his post on 1 December.

Furthermore, a high representative is appointed. The high representative leads the EU's work with foreign affairs and security policy and is also known as the EU's “foreign minister”. The European Council proposed the Spanish Minister for Foreign Affairs Josep Borrel for the position of High Representative. He must first be approved by the President of the Commission to take up his post.

The French Managing Director of the IMF, Christine Lagarde, has been proposed as President of the European Central Bank (ECB). The decision concerning this post is taken by the European Council, following consultation with the European Parliament and the Governing Council of the ECB.

Your right to vote

The European Parliament is the only EU institution that is directly elected in general elections.

You are entitled to vote in the elections to the European Parliament in Sweden if you are a Swedish citizen and you have reached the age of 18 by election day at the latest. You are also entitled to vote in the election to the European Parliament if you are a citizen of another EU member state and are registered in Sweden.

Vote in advance or vote on election day

The EU elections work in the same way as the elections to the municipalities, county councils and parliament in Sweden. A voting card is sent to you at your home and you can then either vote in advance or vote at a polling station on election day. You choose which party you would like to represent you in the European Parliament.

You can also vote for a specific person on the party list by putting a cross next to the name of the person on the voting slip. A particular party must receive at least 4 per cent of the votes to get into the European Parliament.

The Election Authority website

Here you can find out more about the elections in Sweden, voting rights and the electoral register, how to vote, ballot papers, and how election results are calculated.

The Election Authority website

What is the European Parliament?

The European Parliament is the voice of the citizens of the EU. The members of the European Parliament are elected by the citizens of the EU member states in general elections. The European Parliament operates both in Strasbourg in France and in Brussels in Belgium.

There are 751 members in the European Parliament from the EU’s 28 member states. They are known as MEPs (members of the European Parliament). They take part in the decision-making regarding EU laws and the EU budget.

 

There are currently 751 members in the European Parliament. There are currently 751 members in the European Parliament.
Together, voters in the 28 EU member states have elected 751 MEPs. They represent the voters in the European Parliament until the next EU-elections.

The number of MEPs after Brexit

The UK is in the process of withdrawing from the EU (Brexit). Once this has taken place, the number of MEPs will have fallen to 705. Negotiations are in progress between the UK and the EU on the conditions for withdrawal.

The Swedish MEPs

20 Swedish MEPs represent the Swedish citizens. By voting in the EU elections, the citizens of the EU member states decide which political parties and members of parliament will take part in the decision-making in the European Parliament.

Swedish MEPs 2019–2024 on the European Parliament website

 

There are currently 751 members in the European Parliament. There are currently 751 members in the European Parliament.
The EU member states have varying numbers of members in the European Parliament. The number of MEPs from each country depends on the size of its population. Germany, which has the largest population in the EU, has 96 MEPs. Cyprus, Estonia, Luxembourg and Malta each elect six MEPs, the smallest number for any one member state.

MEPs are part of their party groups

The members of the European Parliament debate EU matters and develop new EU laws. Each MEP is part of a party group. Each party group consists of MEPs with similar opinions.

In the Parliament, the MEPs sit together in their party groups, not together with other members from the same country. Parties of the left sit on the left and parties of the right on the right. The Greens and Liberal parties sit in the middle.

Overview of the MEP's according to party group in the EP Overview of the MEP's according to party group in the EP
There are seven party groups and a number of MEPs who are not attached to party groups in the European Parliament 2019–2024. The diagram shows the location of the party groups in the European Parliament. Note that the borderlines between the party groups in the image are approximate. This information is from the first meeting of the new European Parliament in July 2019.

Parties represented in the European Parliament and number of members 2019–2024

  • GUE/NGL 41 Members of Parliament (MEPs)
    Confederal Group of the European United Left - Nordic Green Left. The Left Party is part of this group.
  • S&D 154 MEPs
    Group of the Progressive Alliance of Socialists and Democrats in the European Parliament. The Social Democratic Party is part of this group.
  • Greens/EFA 74 MEPs
    Group of the Greens/European Free Alliance. The Green Party is part of this group.
  • Renew Europe 108 MEPs
    Renew Europe group. The Liberal Party and the Centre Party are part of this group.
  • EPP 182 MEPs
    Group of the European People´s Party (Christian Democrats). The Moderate Party and the Christian Democrats are part of this group.
  • ECR 62 MEPs
    European Conservatives and Reformists Group. The Sweden Democrats are part of this group.
  • ID 73 MEPs
    Identity and Democracy group.
  • NI 57 MEPs
    Non-attached Members.

Political groups in the European Parliament 2019-2024

MEPs by Member State in the European Parliament

  • 96 Germany
  • 74 France
  • 73 Italy and United Kingdom
  • 54 Spain
  • 51 Poland
  • 32 Romania
  • 26 Netherlands
  • 21 Greece, Belgium, Portugal, Czechia and Hungary
  • 20 Sweden
  • 18 Austria
  • 17 Bulgaria
  • 13 Denmark and Finland
  • 11 Ireland and Lithuania
  • 8 Slovenia and Latvia
  • 6 Estonia, Cyprus, Luxembourg and Malta

The UK is in the process of withdrawing from the EU (Brexit). Once this has taken place, the number of MEPs will have fallen to 705.

MEPs by Member State and political group on the European Parliament website

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